Document Type

Article

Comments

Final publication in 29 Economy and Society 559 (2000)

Abstract

This article describes and compares two forms of moral regulation employed in connection with insurance institutions. The first governs through moralized personal attributes or pressures like "temptation" and "character." The second governs through moralized institutional or system attributes and processes described in terms of "efficiency." The article traces these forms of moral regulation from the mid-19th century to the present, arguing that both continue to inform popular and specialized discourses of risk.

Date of Authorship for this Version

May 2000

Included in

Insurance Law Commons

Share

COinS