Document Type

Article

Abstract

Even before the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act, the rhetoric of "welfare reform" debate blamed recipients for their poverty while diverting attention from structural problems of our society. Proponents of "reform" argued that by withholding welfare benefits, government could change recipients' behavior, transform present recipients into "productive members" of society, and solve the intractable problems of poverty. This article analyzes two of the most popular behavior-modification models, Learnfare and Family Cap, and contends that these "reform" efforts were driven by a New Right agenda, an "ideology of division" that manipulated public opinion by highlighting racial and gender biases.

Date of Authorship for this Version

1-1-1992

Keywords

Public welfare, Poor, Behavior modification, Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act, Learnfare, Family Cap, welfare reform, Law

Original Citation

Originally published in Yale Law Journal, Vol. 102, No. 3, pp. 719-746, 1992.

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