Authors

Sarah Hooke Lee

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Professor Lee argues that traditional quality criteria for judging law libraries are now inadequate because they no longer capture the vital multiple missions of today's libraries. She suggests ways that law librarians can begin to develop indicia of quality that can adequately evaluate the contemporary law school library and preserve its core missions.

Date of Authorship for this Version

1-1-2008

Keywords

Law libraries, Evaluation, academic libraries, European libraries, law schools, print, electronic sources, books, volume count, title count, accreditation, American Bar Association, ABA, standards, law librarians, licenses, core missions, collections, outcomes-based assessment models, inputs, outputs, services, Hinderman, patrons, teaching, interlibrary loan, ILL, access, preservation, collaboration, Legal Information Preservation Alliance, LIPA, collection development, open access, questionnaires, information literacy, Law School Survey of Student Engagement, LSSSE, Library and Information Science

Original Citation

Originally published in Law Library Journal, v.100, p.9, 2008.

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